Friday, January 21, 2011

Former Pastor arrested in custody case

John David Boggs, a controversial former pastor and roofing contractor, was arrested Wednesday in Bullitt County for allegedly violating a court order regarding his children's custody — an order his lawyer says he was never served.

Boggs, 36, pleaded not guilty in Bullitt District Court to one count of custodial interference, a class D felony under state law. He was released from the Bullitt County Detention Center on Thursday on a cash bond of $10,000 and is scheduled for a court appearance on Monday, according to the court clerk.
The case stems from a dispute between Boggs and his estranged wife, Christel Helm-Boggs, now of Texas, who have each filed for divorce and for custody of the children in separate courts.
Boggs was arrested at his Shepherdsville home on a warrant for allegedly violating an order of the 378th Judicial District in Ellis County, Texas, granting custody of the couple's three children to his estranged wife. The arresting officer, Sgt. Charles Mann of Bullitt County Sheriff's Office, said in the citation that Boggs refused to answer the door and that the officer forced entry out of concern for the safety of the children.
Boggs' lawyer, Greg Butrum, said the case involved "the most meritless criminal charges I have ever seen" and predicted a quick dismissal.
He said Boggs had never been served the custody order from Texas so Boggs cannot be held liable for violating such an order.
Butrum said Boggs recently filed his own divorce action in Bullitt County and also filed a petition in Jefferson Circuit Court for custody of the couple's three children, aged 4, 7 and 11.
According to that filing, Helm-Boggs took the children last summer with her to Texas, where her family lives. Boggs took the three children back to Kentucky in December, and Helm-Boggs took their daughter back to Texas over the New Year's holiday, according to the filing. Butrum said his understanding is that the mother headed home for Texas with the sons after Boggs' arrest.
"It's a family tragedy," Butrum said.
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Boggs was formerly pastor of New Vision Ministry Center, affiliated with the Church of God, a Cleveland, Tenn.-based Pentecostal denomination. He spent several years attempting to build a large church using unconventional high-energy worship and sermon themes based on popular culture, including a move to the former Walmart on the Outer Loop.


Boggs was dismissed as pastor in June 2010 by the church for unspecified reasons that Boggs acknowledged involved family issues. His Jefferson County filing says the couple experienced marital troubles that month from which they have not recovered.
Before his dismissal, his church and denomination had stood by Boggs despite repeated accusations of unseemly business practices throughout the South and Midwest, where he had set up roofing operations that capitalized on large volumes of business following hail storms, tornadoes and hurricanes. He and his companies drew repeated lawsuits, fines and other complaints from customers, business associates and regulatory officials.
Both Boggs and New Vision Ministry Center wound up filing for federal bankruptcy. Boggs and his wife restructured payments on millions in liabilities to tax authorities and private entities in a case completed last year.
The church has listed about $1.8 million in debts in a case filed in September, mainly to contractors and others associated with the short-lived Walmart project. The congregation reconstituted as Outer Loop Church of God and moved back to its original location about two miles east of the Walmart site.

Boggs was formerly pastor of New Vision Ministry Center, affiliated with the Church of God, a Cleveland, Tenn.-based Pentecostal denomination. He spent several years attempting to build a large church using unconventional high-energy worship and sermon themes based on popular culture, including a move to the former Walmart on the Outer Loop.

Boggs was dismissed as pastor in June 2010 by the church for unspecified reasons that Boggs acknowledged involved family issues. His Jefferson County filing says the couple experienced marital troubles that month from which they have not recovered.
Before his dismissal, his church and denomination had stood by Boggs despite repeated accusations of unseemly business practices throughout the South and Midwest, where he had set up roofing operations that capitalized on large volumes of business following hail storms, tornadoes and hurricanes. He and his companies drew repeated lawsuits, fines and other complaints from customers, business associates and regulatory officials.
Both Boggs and New Vision Ministry Center wound up filing for federal bankruptcy. Boggs and his wife restructured payments on millions in liabilities to tax authorities and private entities in a case completed last year.
The church has listed about $1.8 million in debts in a case filed in September, mainly to contractors and others associated with the short-lived Walmart project. The congregation reconstituted as Outer Loop Church of God and moved back to its original location about two miles east of the Walmart site.


http://www.courier-journal.com/article/20110120/NEWS01/301200075/1008/news01/Former+pastor+arrested+in+custody+case

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

All religion is poisonous. Christianity and Islam are both lies that branched off from the lie of Judeism. While there is most likely a grand architech of this universe, that entity has no affiliation with any of the nonsensical man-made religions mentioned above.